Posted by: brothermartin | August 11, 2008

THE INVISIBLE PLANT

I don’t agree with everything this guy says….he seems to think that Stalin was relatively benign, and I think he’s dead wrong there–but overall I think he has a good point about how bizarrely and conveniently we’re ignoring a plant that could answer a lot of our energy problems.

SEE NO HEMP, HEAR NO HEMP, SPEAK NO HEMP

PT. 1

by Rand Clifford

8/10/08

Molders of public opinion work in such insidious ways that their actual methods and means usually go unnoticed. While inculcation of propaganda, lies, and disinformation do much of the shaping, simple omission has profound effect—might even be the favorite because it is, after all, nothing. It’s hard to imagine nothing ever accomplishing so much, but consider that for most people under common awareness manipulation, whatever corporate media (CorpoMedia) omits, to a large extent doesn’t exist.

Flag-draped coffins streaming home in the dead of night from our war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan are under media blackout, and so mean as little to most Americans as the actual reasons for the invasions, or even the hideous war crimes themselves. By its nature, omission is all but limitless; its application by CorpoMedia has grown to enormous proportions as celebrities and sports overpower hard news. So this article focuses on omission of—the calculated disappearing of a single thing that for thousands of years has profoundly benefitted the health and well-being of people all over the world, and today offers so much more: Cannabis hemp.

6/26/08, the Economist newspaper published: Better Living Through Chemurgy. http://www.truthabouttrade.org/content/view/11985/54/ A decent article overall, at the end of paragraph one it points out that chemurgy is an ugly word; subtle implications being that there might actually be something ugly about chemurgy itself? Chemurgy is a branch of applied chemistry focused on preparing industrial products and consumer goods from agricultural raw materials. The term first appeared in William J. Hale’s 1934 book The Farm Chemurgic. The National Farm Chemurgic Council was formed a year later to foster greater industrial use of agricultural raw material—something ugly in ravenous petrochemical empire eyes….

The Economist article lauds American scientist George Washington Carver for developing hundreds of industrial products from peanuts…then comes disinformation: “In the 1930s, Henry Ford started using parts made from agricultural materials, and even built an ‘all-soy car’”. Sorry, not “all-soy”—Ford made a car in 1941 of mostly resin-stiffened hemp fiber, with hemp plastic windows, and powered by hemp ethanol. Soy resins were used, but it has always been known as Ford’s Hemp Car. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxlj6fgQ-ZU

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